Ad Nut
Feb 20, 2020

Stop spreading homophobic slurs already, challenges ANZ

ANZ loves to celebrate love for its annual sponsorship of the Sydney Gay & Lesbian Mardi Gras, but this year, along with TBWA Melbourne, it wants to challenge hate.

ANZ and TBWA's previous LGBTIQ+ campaigns have heralded bright glittery ads celebrating all things gay, but 2020's offering takes a slightly more sobering look at how the community continues to endure hurtful homophobic language.

In fact, homphobic slurs are posted online more than 43 times a minute, the ad claims, citing Crimson Hexagon data. According to YouGov research, three-quarters (74%) of LGBTIQ+ people in Australia believe that hurtful and homophobic language directed at them is a major issue, but only a third (34%) feel confident in calling it out. Jarring with this, more than half (52%) of non-LGBTIQ+ Australians believes members of the community get offended too easily.

To shine a light on the issue, ANZ and TBWA Melbourne's campaign, directed by the Glue Society, portrays a collection of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and queer individuals sharing their own lived experiences of being called offensive names. It ends with an appeal to "Stop the hate" and spread more '#LoveSpeech'. 

Surrounding the film, ANZ is revealing a prominent billboard overlooking the Mardi Gras parade-route which boldly espouses that “Boys Should Never Wear Dresses”, only to see LGBTIQ+ Graffiti artist, David Lee Pereira, disarm this hurtful slur by adding, "Without A Killer Pair of Heels”. 

The billboard is supported by a series of colourful posters and GIFs that take frequently heard hurtful comments and flip them into #LoveSpeech.


ANZ has also created a Google Chrome Extension, called the "Hurt Blocker", that transforms slurs into happy emojis, and a guide that explains how words (even when unintentional) can hurt. Influencers Benjamin Law (social commentator and writer), Moana Hope (AFLW) and Georgie Stone (actress and trans advocate) are also set to lend their voices to the initiative.


CMO Sweta Mehra said: "With unkind, cruel and damaging comments directed at the community every single day, we think it’s time for more #LoveSpeech."

ANZ and TBWA have supported Sydney's annual Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras for several years now, starting with the brand's Cannes Lions Grand Prix-winning 'GAYTMs' in 2014. Other standout work across the years has included 2017's 'Hold tight', a simple yet powerful campaign chronicling the moment gay couples stop holding hands (one of Ad Nut's all-time favourite films), and last year's 'Signs of love', where the bank jazzed up all the Oxford Streets in Australia.

Credits

ANZ Bank Australia
TBWA\Melbourne
Thrive PR
Revolver/Will O’Rourke and The Glue Society
PHD Media

Ad Nut is a surprisingly literate woodland creature that for unknown reasons has an unhealthy obsession with advertising. Ad Nut gathers ads from all over Asia and the world for your viewing pleasure, because Ad Nut loves you. You can also check out Ad Nut's Advertising Hall of Fame, or read about Ad Nut's strange obsession with 'murderous beasts'.

 

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