Faaez Samadi
Jun 12, 2017

IPG Mediabrands launches Society Singapore

New unit will handle all social-media work for the office.

(l-r) Jacob Teo, Xing Long Tan & David Haddad
(l-r) Jacob Teo, Xing Long Tan & David Haddad

IPG Mediabrands today announced the creation of Society Singapore, the latest branch of the media agency’s social-media offering.

Society will take on all aspects of IPG Mediabrands’ social media work, including strategy, content creation, community management, social CRM, analytics, paid social and amplification.

The agency’s social media arm, Rally, has been rebranded and folded into Society. Xing Long Tan will lead Society Singapore, reporting to IPG Mediabrands’ Singapore head of digital Jacob Teo.

“Society Singapore has the power to inhabit a dynamic space in the market. Consumerism is grooved by millennials, and Society is a fresh young agency driven by an agile, entrepreneurial outlook,” said Teo.

Society Singapore has taken on Rally clients including Johnson & Johnson, National Council of Social Service and KidsSTOP. It has also won its first new client, taking on the social media business for shopping mall and ferry terminal Harbourfront Centre.

David Haddad, managing director of IPG Mediabrands Singapore, said the launch of Society in the market is a “direct response to market demand”. 

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