Staff Reporters
Feb 5, 2021

Campaign Crash Course: How to maximise brand impact during Chinese New Year

As Chinese New Year celebrations are shifted online, brands have to figure out new ways to stand out in one of the biggest marketing events of the year. This lesson will highlight the components of an effective strategy by analysing successful campaigns of years past.

Welcome back to Campaign Asia-Pacific's Crash Course learning series, in which you will learn valuable lessons and practical business tips on trending and essential topics from industry experts in just five minutes. Think of it as a mini mini MBA, if you will.

Lessons will cover the breadth of the marcomms industry, including technology, creative, media, strategy, leadership, diversity and inclusion and more. We'll start off by introducing you to larger topics and delve deeper into specific elements in the future. This series is designed to be useful to C-suite executives as well as those just starting out in their careers.

The lesson

The 18th lesson in the Crash Course series will uncover some of the components of a successful Chinese New Year campaign and how marketers can stand out during the biggest festival of the year. With celebrations mostly limited to virtual interactions as China faces another year of Covid-19 restrictions, it is becoming ever more critical for brands to find innovative ways to cut-through online and in social media. 

There isn't a fixed framework to guarantee success during the spring festival, but this lesson will analyse some of the most effective campaigns of years past and provide tips on how marketers can replicate their success.

In this lesson you will learn:

  • How to gather audience insights to inform your marketing strategy.
  • The role of long-term investment.
  • How to use interactive technology.
  • Leveraging online to offline.
  • Strategy for international brands.
  • The role of storytelling.

Your teacher

Wong Kian Fong is the head of UM Studios at UM China. He has more than 17 years’ experience in advertising, digital marketing and business management, and has worked on the digital marketing and content strategy for major brands including Johnson & Johnson, Amex, New Balance, Tourism Australia, Taobao, Huawei and Apple.

Wong only joined UM in December, from his previous role leading the Greater China region at media and social intelligence software company Isentia. He also led R/GA's entry into China and was the international managing director of marketing firm Deep Focus. Wong has appeared in Campaign China's Digital A-list twice, in 2014 and 2015.

The quiz

After you watch the above video, test your knowledge of ad verification with this quiz:

 

 
Campaign Crash Course is an ongoing series with new courses to be released on Fridays. We are always looking for feedback and ideas. Have a suggestion or want to take part? Complete our feedback form or email our editors.

 

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