Ad Nut
Jan 29, 2018

'Uncaged' brand makes most of caged football matches

Tiger Beer launches its street football festival in Cambodia with a campaign through Cream Cambodia.

Cream Cambodia has launched its fifth annual campaign for Tiger Beer's Tiger Street Football Festival, which features 5-on-5 matches played in caged pitches.

The festival, which the brand claims has become Cambodia’s largest outdoor sporting event, started on January 20 and will travel to eight cities, culminating in the finals in Phnom Penh from March 7 through 11. Coach and former Manchester United star Ryan Giggs will appear at the final event.

The TV-led campaign also includes social media, print and outdoor. Last year's campaign made Tiger Beer the top Facebook fan page in the country, according to Cream CEO Brenden Arnold.

The Tiger TVC was directed by Peter Aquilina and produced by Febbo Bangkok with Time Lapse Bangkok for CGI and animation. Ad Nut admires the hyper-real lighting on the action shots, but feels that the defensive players leave something to be desired.

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