Robert Sawatzky
Jul 10, 2019

Kim Douglas leaves Publicis Sapient

VP and managing director of Publicis Sapient in Singapore has left the business after nine years.

Kim Douglas
Kim Douglas

Publicis Sapient's outspoken leader in Singapore has left the business, Campaign has learned.

Kim Douglas, who has held leadership roles at the digital consultancy for the past nine years and who has more than 25 years' experience in the marcomms industry, has "come to a mutual agreement" with the firm, a Publicis Sapient spokesperson confirmed.

Douglas is now on gardening leave and preparing for future opportunities he wished to pursue outside the business, confirmed a Publicis Sapient spokesperson.  

Integrating the Sapient business into Publicis has been a challenging task worldwide since the 2015 takeover, the holding company's global chief executives have acknowledged.

However, the spokesperson noted Douglas' departure is an individual case and not part of a broader event at the firm.

In a frank interview with Campaign a year ago, Douglas described many of misnomers in the digital transformation business and how clients appreciate honest assessments of what they can realistically achieve.

"We thank him for his leadership and service and above all wish him the best of luck in his future endeavours outside of the Groupe," the spokesperson said.

Campaign has reached out to Douglas for comment. 

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