Ad Nut
Oct 7, 2016

This truck ad is fake but has a real message (NSFW language)

Satirical spot skewers sexism.

Like most of the world, Ad Nut has commended P&G for its 'Share the load' campaign, which has done a lot to normalise the idea of men doing housework.

With the tide (hopefully) changing in that product category, it's a good idea to look for overt and/or unconscious sexism in other areas. And here's a wonderful example, courtesy of Funny Girls, a New Zealand sketch show.

Of course the sexist narrator is exaggerated for effect (it is satire, after all), but don't miss the point. What ads of yours might be alienating half of the potential buyers just by their tone and imagery? Better yet, where might you have an opportunity to stand out by being the first to break the mould?

(Thanks to Mashable, where Ad Nut first saw this.)

Here's two past examples of ads that played with gender conventions, one successful and the other not so much:

Ad NutAd Nut is a surprisingly literate woodland creature that for some unknown reason has an unhealthy obsession with advertising. Ad Nut gathers ads from all over the world and presents them for your viewing pleasure. Because Ad Nut loves you.

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