Matthew Miller
Jul 24, 2018

Only 14% of audience-data purchases deemed successful

Data accuracy and imprecise targeting are key concerns for marketers buying audience data, according to research by Lotame.

Only 14% of audience-data purchases deemed successful

While 57% of marketers say audience data is very valuable to them (and only 1% say it is not at all valuable), only 14% of marketers say their purchases of audience data are very successful, according to a new report from DMP (data-management platform) provider Lotame.  

The company's survey of 300 brand marketers that purchase or use audience data found that only 20% are “very confident” about the accuracy of the data they buy, while 68% are “somewhat confident.” Meanwhile, 12% are either “slightly confident” or “not confident at all” in the accuracy of the data they purchase.

Only 20% are very confident in the data they buy; higher accuracy would encourage more purchases.
 
Reasons purchases of audience data are deemed unsuccessful.
 
The top three reasons for concern about data quality.
 
Top evaluation criteria marketers use when buying data.
 
The factors marketers usually or always target in campaigns using demographic data.
 
The metrics marketers typically use to measure the success of campaigns.
 
See more Top of the Charts

 

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