Emmet McGonagle
Jun 2, 2020

Nike, Adidas, Netflix, Ben & Jerry's and more show support for Black Lives Matter

Protests have been taking place across globe following George Floyd's death.

Nike: brand encourages public to provoke change
Nike: brand encourages public to provoke change

Nike, Adidas, Netflix and Ben & Jerry’s are among brands that have spoken out about their support for the Black Lives Matter movement over the weekend.

Anti-racism protests are continuing around the world after the death of George Floyd, who was killed by a police officer.

Floyd's death prompted a wave of protests, with curfews and the firing of rubber bullets and tear gas in the US unable to deter protestors, who are calling for an end to police violence against ethnic-minority people.

Amid the protests, brands have been showing their support for the Black Lives Matter movement.

Nike released a powerful spot encouraging people to "be part of the change" and work to resolve the issue of institutionalised racism. Created by Wieden & Kennedy Portland, "Don’t do it" inverts the brand’s tagline and urges: "Don’t sit back and be silent."

The spot was quickly supported by rival Adidas, which shared the work on Twitter alongside the words: "Together is how we move forward. Together is how we make change."

Ben & Jerry’s, which has been vocal about its support of Black Lives Matter since the Ferguson unrest in 2014, when unarmed 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot and killed by a police officer in Missouri, showed its support in a lengthy statement.

The ice-cream brand encouraged people to recognise a need to tackle "systemic and institutionalised racism", highlighting racial injustice as "the defining civil rights and social justice issues of our time". It declared: "All lives do matter. But all lives will not matter until black lives matter."

Other brands altered their logos, including Google, which has added a message of support to its US home page alongside a black ribbon. Chief executive Sundar Pichai tweeted a photo of Google’s revamped look alongside the words: "We stand in support of racial equality and all those who search for it."

Twitter has opted to change its profile image to a black-and-white version of its logo, adding "#BlackLivesMatter" to its description. Last week, Twitter added a waring message to a post from US president Donald Trump that it found to be "glorifying violence".

For some brands, Twitter was also the platform they chose to voice their stance on Black Lives Matter. Netflix encouraged the public to speak up and provoke change in a post that read: "To be silent is to be complicit. We have a platform and we have a duty to our black members, employees, creators and talent to speak up."

Amazon celebrated the role of black artists, writers and producers, announcing that it is standing in solidarity with "the black community… and allies in the fight against racism and injustice".

A similar message was posted by Disney, which revealed support for "our fellow black employees, storytellers, creators and the entire black community" during this time of unrest.

Source:
Campaign US

Related Articles

Just Published

17 hours ago

Uproar: Are animal portrayals in ads a new brand risk?

Advertisers and agencies love animals, because animals sell. But a Year of the Tiger Gucci campaign that made activists growl shows that the definition of what’s appropriate may be evolving when it comes to using the world's fauna.

18 hours ago

Mark Heap on ‘moving across the aisles’ to ...

Media agencies offer broadly the same services as one another, and use propositions like ‘good growth’ and ‘people first’ to establish an identity. But what do these mean, in practical terms, and how do they influence leadership strategies? Mark Heap takes us inside the industry.

18 hours ago

The ride of the tiger: Feast your eyes on BMW's ...

While other brands make long, dramatic Chinese New Year films, the carmaker and TBWA's Bolt have programmed in a very different route: 90 seconds that's 'nothing but sheer joy'.

18 hours ago

The Beijing Olympics: A non-starter for global sponsors

SHANGHAI ZHAN PODCAST: Beijing-based sports-marketing expert Mark Dreyer says the games will see largely Chinese brands targeting the China market, with many employing Chinese-American skier/model Eileen Gu.