Imogen Watson
Sep 25, 2022

Mother's first H&M work is a love letter to young British women and clothes

From what you reach for on bloated period days, to the joy of compliments from other women on a night out, the campaign uses insight gathered over hours of conversations with young women across the UK.

Mother's first H&M work is a love letter to young British women and clothes

Mother London has unveiled its first work for H&M – a love letter to young British women and their wardrobes, launched to dovetail with the "back to campus" window.

"The here for it" uses insights gathered over hours of conversations with young women across the UK to understand how what women wear tells a story about their feelings.

The campaign marks Mother London's first work for H&M since it won the creative account earlier this year after a competitive pitch.

"The relationship between what we wear and how we feel runs deep," said Paulina Karelius, head of customer activation and marketing H&M UK and Ireland.

"Being a young woman can feel joyful, vulnerable, powerful – and everything in between. We wanted this work to be an honest window into young womanhood."

Source:
Campaign UK
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