Staff Reporters
Jun 30, 2010

CASE STUDY: Canon appeals to entry level photographers

Canon took a different approach to maintain its lead and appeal to entry level photographers as a new consumer group with a limited understanding of technology.

CASE STUDY: Canon appeals to entry level photographers

Aim

The Canon EOS is the leading brand in Australia's DSLR camera category. However, traditionally, advertising has concentrated on its technological advantages. The challenge was to find a point of difference beyond this in order to maintain its lead and to appeal to a new consumer group - entry level photographers with a limited understanding of technology.

Execution

Canon determined that the target audience was interested in shooting more creative pictures than could be achieved with a 'point and shoot' camera. The campaign set out to reassure people that more technologically advanced cameras were accessible and easy to use. The premise was simple: great photography is not about technology, but inspiration.

Leo Burnett integrated TV, online and event marketing to develop 'EOS Photochains' - a tool linking one photographer to the next. By transforming photography from something people traditionally do on their own into a way to connect with others, Photochains was able to develop its own social network of photographers and offer them a new creative experience.

Supporting TV spots drove traffic to the website, where users could join an existing Photochain or create their own. The live network was showcased in subsequent TV advertising to build momentum around the initiative.

Results

EOS Photochains created a new dialogue between Canon EOS and the Australian photographic community. Revenue experienced double-digit growth and time spent on the website was four times the industry average. Since the campaign launched, an average of 94 photos a day were uploaded to the website. This equates to four photos an hour, and more than 20,000 photos were uploaded from across the country. Canon EOS sales rose to a record 54 per cent of the Australian market share.

This article was originally published as part of the 2010 Top 1000 Brands report.

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