Robert Sawatzky
Jun 28, 2019

Big brands: look around you, see what challengers are doing

CANNES IN SHORTS: At the launch of PHD's new book, Overthrow II, co-author Malcolm Devoy explains how big established brands ought to react to purpose-driven challengers in their category.

Most large brands are more than aware of the challengers in their categories.  Rarely are they disrupted by surprise.  More often, the mistake made by big brands is that they underestimate or ignore what the challengers represent.  After all, upstart competition can often be bought or crushed if necessary.

But what happens when competitors represent not commercial entities but social movements? At the Cannes book launch of PHD and Eatbigfish's new book, Overthrow II, two challenger brands, Oatly and Tony's Chocolonely explained how they were disrupting the dairy and chocolate industry respectively, with the primary aim of creating sustainability and social change rather than stealing market share.

They explained how 'purpose' was not a strategy tradional brands ought to employ, but rather had to be something they practiced and truly stood for.  In this video, PHD chief strategy officer for EMEA and Overthrow II co-author Malcolm Devoy talks about the tricky position some large brands are in and how they ought to respond. 

 

 

 

Source:
Campaign Asia

Related Articles

Just Published

4 hours ago

Whalar Group appoints Neil Waller and James Street ...

EXCLUSIVE: The duo will lead six business pillars and attempt to win more creative, not just creator, briefs with the hire of Christoph Becker as chief creative officer.

4 hours ago

Radiocentre: 'BBC Radio could not be funded by ...

Industry body for commercial radio analyses the viability of wholly ad-funded BBC Radio.

4 hours ago

Team behind Eugene the world-record egg sell rights ...

Eugene the egg was Instagram’s most-liked photo in 2019.

4 hours ago

Two generations, same Spotify playlist: Why ...

They might be separated by 30 years but the two generations have many similarities, says the Forsman & Bodenfors cultural strategist.