Jenny Chan 陳詠欣
Aug 5, 2015

HKTVmall blankets MTR stations with punny humour

HONG KONG - HKTVmall has executed a takeover of trackside advertising in Hong Kong's MTR system, covering more than 3,000 JCDecaux ad locations in 51 stations with brightly coloured ads that present visual puns based on the names of the stations and the online retailer's products.

image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading
image.Heading

The mega MTR campaign is by creative agency Anonymous and media agency The Bread Digital.

It's not only the first-ever buyout of MTR trackside advertising by a single advertiser, but also clever. The campaign uses the names of the train stations to craft puns, based on words that sound similar in Cantonese, for sushi, hairy crabs, honeydew and more. Yum!

The ads at Tsim Sha Tsui station, feature the legendary “Suzi of Tsim Sha Tsui” and the abundance of sushi bars in that bustling district to illustrate a free gift of sashimi airfreight from Tsukiji upon a HK$400 purchase from HKTVmall.

On the Wan Chai station's trackside billboards, a hairy crab is walking sideways through the streets of the Wan Chai district, like a tram.

In the Airport Express Hong Kong Station, the visuals focus on honeydew and its Cantonese pronunciation, which sonically resembles “don't die”. Thus the ads convey the never-say-die spirit of Hong Kongers. 

As for MTR passengers at Wong Tai Sin station, they get to look through “missing chicken” notices before their worship at the Wong Tai Sin Temple.
 
For all 51 pieces of this fine work, have a look at this picture gallery.
 
 

Related Articles

Just Published

20 hours ago

Uproar: Are animal portrayals in ads a new brand risk?

Advertisers and agencies love animals, because animals sell. But a Year of the Tiger Gucci campaign that made activists growl shows that the definition of what’s appropriate may be evolving when it comes to using the world's fauna.

20 hours ago

Mark Heap on ‘moving across the aisles’ to ...

Media agencies offer broadly the same services as one another, and use propositions like ‘good growth’ and ‘people first’ to establish an identity. But what do these mean, in practical terms, and how do they influence leadership strategies? Mark Heap takes us inside the industry.

20 hours ago

The ride of the tiger: Feast your eyes on BMW's ...

While other brands make long, dramatic Chinese New Year films, the carmaker and TBWA's Bolt have programmed in a very different route: 90 seconds that's 'nothing but sheer joy'.

20 hours ago

The Beijing Olympics: A non-starter for global sponsors

SHANGHAI ZHAN PODCAST: Beijing-based sports-marketing expert Mark Dreyer says the games will see largely Chinese brands targeting the China market, with many employing Chinese-American skier/model Eileen Gu.