Staff Reporters
Feb 5, 2018

Leo Burnett wins Abbott China’s infant milk powder account

This follows a competitive pitch faceoff with Havas in Dec 2017.

Eleva Organic is the most expensive infant formula in mainland China
Eleva Organic is the most expensive infant formula in mainland China

Abbott China appointed Leo Burnett Shanghai as its creative agency, to be responsible for developing integrated communication strategies and campaigns for four infant milk powder brands.

This follows a competitive pitch that ended in December, with Havas tipped to be in the final faceoff.
 
Leo Burnett's scope of work covers Eleva (菁智), Similac (亲体), Total Comfort (亲护) and PediaSure (小安素) under Abbott's nutrition category. Abbott said it is aiming to raise the awareness and reputation of these brands in China's cluttered, competitive infant milk powder market.  

Every year, the brand is reaching out to new moms who are mostly from the post-90s generation, so communication has to be relevant and appealing to them, said Angie Wong, managing director of Leo Burnett Shanghai.

Update at 5:30pm: A Havas spokesperson said the agency participated in initial discussions with the client but declined to comment further.
 
 

 

Source:
Campaign China

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