Jin Bo
Dec 20, 2010

Greenpeace plants 'disposable forest' in Beijing in new campaign

To call attention to the urgent need for forest conservation in China, Greenpeace and Ogilvy Beijing have teamed up to plant an eye-catching 'chopstick forest,' which will be on display outside The Place, a popular shopping center in Beijing, from 18 to 20 December.

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China ranks 139th worldwide in forest land per capita and the mass production, and the consumption of disposable wooden chopsticks - 23 billion pairs in 2009 - places a further unnecessary and heavy burden on limited forest lands.

With the 'Disposable forest' campaign, conceptualised and created by Ogilvy, Greenpeace aims to raise awareness of the issue and appeal to the Chinese public to reject the use of disposable chopsticks to protect and conserve China’s deficient forest resources.

Over the last several months, Ogilvy worked with Greenpeace, local artist Yinhai Xu and more than 200 volunteers from 20 Chinese universities to collect more than 80,000 pairs of used (and sanitised) disposable wooden chopsticks from restaurants and repurposed them into a forest of chopstick trees that stand approximately five metres tall.

Aihong Li, director of Greenpeace’s Forest Protection Programme, said: “These trees should have been abundantly green and vibrant, but now they are pieced together with wasteful disposable chopsticks. Our hope is that everyone in China will join us in saying ‘no’ to disposable chopsticks to protect our forests.”

Bill Chan, executive creative director of O&M Advertising Beijing, added: “We hope this display will leave an impactful impression on people and ultimately change their behavior.”

The Disposable Forest will be on display at The Place in Beijing for three days. To expand its audience and impact, plans are in the works for the portable exhibit to be put on show at universities and art galleries around Beijing in the coming months.

The public is also invited to pledge their support and commitment to the cause on a mini-site created by Ogilvy Beijing especially for Greenpeace’s Disposable Forest campaign. Each time a person’s name is added to the petition a green leaf will appear on a tree online.


Credits

Project: Disposable Forest
Client: Greenpeace
Brief:
Create awareness of the destruction of forests due to disposable chopsticks and begin to get commitment from citizens to stop their personal use.
Creative Agency:
Ogilvy Beijing
Creative Directors: Bill Chan, Doug Schiff, Wilson Chow
Art Director: He Shiyang, Qi Shujie, Wang Gongxing, Liu Dong, Xiao Xin
Copywriter: Ray Hao, Doug Schiff
Account Management: Yoyo Liu, Vivian Guo


China ranks 139th worldwide in forest land per capita and the mass production and consumption of disposable wooden chopsticks – 23 billion pairs in 2009 places a further unnecessary and heavy burden on limited forest lands.

 
With the “Disposable Forest” campaign conceptualized and created by Ogilvy, Greenpeace aims to raise awareness of the issue and appeal to the Chinese public to reject the use of disposable chopsticks to protect and conserve China’s deficient forest resources.

Over the last several months, Ogilvy worked with Greenpeace, local artist Yinhai Xu and more than 200 volunteers from 20 Chinese universities to collect more than 80,000 pairs of used (and sanitized) disposable wooden chopsticks from restaurants and repurposed them into a forest of chopstick trees that stand approximately five meters tall.

Aihong Li, director of Greenpeace’s Forest Protection Program, said: “These trees should have been abundantly green and vibrant, but now they are pieced together with wasteful disposable chopsticks. Our hope is that everyone in China will join us in saying ‘no’ to disposable chopsticks to protect our forests.”


Bill Chan, executive creative director of O&M Advertising Beijing, said: “We hope this display will leave an impactful impression on people and ultimately change their behavior.”

Greenpeace staff and volunteers including Xiao Wei, lead singer of the Chinese band “The Catcher in the Rye,” tree maker artist Yinhai Xu, Ogilvy staff and students launched the Disposable Forest to the public and media at an event outside The Place on 18 December.

The Disposable Forest will be on display at The Place in Beijing for three days. To expand its audience and impact, plans are in the works for the portable exhibit to be put on show at universities and art galleries around Beijing in the coming months.

The public is also invited to pledge their support and commitment to the cause on a mini-site created by Ogilvy Beijing especially for Greenpeace’s Disposable Forest campaign. Each time a person’s name is added to the petition a green leaf will appear on a tree online: http://act.greenpeace.org.cn/kuaizi/

Ogilvy Beijing‟s previous campaigns for Greenpeace included print campaigns, TVCs, online virals, websites and direct marketing pieces.
Source:
Campaign China

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