Laura Entis
Aug 23, 2020

AT&T passes the microphone to US employees for BLM campaign

The telecom giant's social media director felt it was important to hear from Black workers, not executives.

AT&T passes the microphone to US employees for BLM campaign

In the wake of the protests and conversations around systemic racism and inequality that George Floyd’s death ignited, Black AT&T employees took to their own social media platforms to express their thoughts. The company then amplified these responses on its own social channels.

Following Floyd’s death on May 25, 2020, AT&T decided to not put out any new social content for two weeks. During this time, the company discussed its longer-term social strategy. Returning to simply posting about new products and services didn’t feel right, said Brandi Briggs, AT&T’s director of social media.

“When something happens in the world that impacts one of our core values, we have to take a stand,” she said. “One of our core values is to stand for equality.”

While many other corporations released statements from their CEOs, Briggs and her team decided to highlight voices from employees. Since 2016, AT&T has held an internal program called Dialogues of Understanding, in which employees of different races, ethnicities and nationalities gather together to discuss the differences, challenges and commonalities in their lived experiences. 

“That was something that was internal to AT&T,” Briggs said. “We thought it would be a natural progression to take the initiatives and make it public.”

In reaction to Floyd’s death, many employees posted personal reactions and concerns on their own social media platforms.

Briggs and her team reached out to some of these workers to see if they’d be comfortable with AT&T sharing their messages on its social platforms. For the month of June, it posted these responses, deciding to exclusively amplify Black voices.

“The Black community had been underrepresented for a long time,” Briggs said. In this moment, “we have people’s attention; they see the pain we are going through.”

AT&T decided to extend the campaign beyond June, sharing a few posts each month from employees on its social channels. As the movement evolved, so have the posts from employees. What started as reactions and calls to action has shifted into workers sharing resources and the actions they’ve taken in response to Floyd’s death.

“The creative behind it was started by employees,” Briggs said. “Everything was employee-driven.”

Results

Across AT&T’s Instagram, Twitter and LinkedIn channels, campaign posts garnered three-times the impressions and two-times the engagements of all diversity initiatives the company put out in the last year combined. Out of all the responses to the posts, 92% were positive.

The videos posted as part of the campaign generated 67% more views, on average, than videos throughout the last year. Content posted in June also led to a 50,000 increase in AT&T’s social followers.

Source:
PRWeek

Related Articles

Just Published

5 hours ago

Mindshare adds dedicated China leadership

EXCLUSIVE: APAC CEO Amrita Randhawa has relinquished her China responsibilities to two new leaders, Benjamin Condit and Linda Lin.

5 hours ago

Pinterest unveils new tools and insights for marketers

Major takeaways from the platform’s first global advertiser summit.

5 hours ago

Crash Course: How to develop a content strategy

You know content should be a key part of your overall brand strategy, but where do you start? This course explains the key steps you should take to ensure an effective content journey.

6 hours ago

The unlimited potential of live storytelling in ...

Brands like Standard Chartered, Uber Eats and Mastercard achieve impact by marrying human emotions with the unpredictability and excitement of live sports.