Staff Reporters
Nov 6, 2017

Best spaces to work: Blippar APAC

AR has a new home in Asia-Pacific.

Since landing in Singapore in 2015, augmented reality platform Blippar has been steadily educating the Asia-Pacific region on the potential of AR.

So the launch of a brand new APAC headquarters in the heart of Singapore’s central business district suggests the appetite for AR is growing.

Huge windows with lots of natural light affords great city views, while areas bedecked in modern furniture and Blippar orange provide plenty of space to test out the company’s AR offerings with different brands. A handy display area around the lifts give visitors a taste of the brands Blippar is already partnering with.

“Over the last two years we have seen strong appetite and buy-in from large multi-national brands and government institutions alike, looking to leverage the benefits AR brings in the region.” says Chris Bell, Blippar’s APAC commercial director. “We see APAC as a key growth region for Blippar and the adoption of new technologies.”

See also: Blippar scales back Japan office after business model change

Note: 'Best spaces to work' merely highlights new and cool workspaces; it should not be interpreted as an endorsement of a company's overall work experience.

See more 'Best spaces to work'

 

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