Staff Reporters
Dec 1, 2022

Creative Minds: Thasorn Boonyanate on having parents in adland

The chief creative officer of BBDO Thailand talks about his favourite campaign that involved throwing the client brief out to the public.

Thasorn Boonyanate
Thasorn Boonyanate
In Creative Minds, we ask APAC creatives a long list of questions, from serious to silly, and ask them to pick 11 to answer. (Why 11? Just because.) Want to be featured?

Name: Thasorn Boonyanate

Origin: Bangkok

Places lived/worked: Bangkok and Shanghai

Pronouns: He/him

CV:

  • Chief creative officer, BBDO, Bangkok
  • Executive creative director, Wunderman Thompson, Bangkok
  • Creative director, JWT, Bangkok
  • Creative director, BBDO, Shanghai
  • Senior creative/content, Fred&Farid, Shanghai
  • Copywriter/Director, BBDO, Bangkok
  • Copywriter, Lowe, Bangkok
  • Copywriter, Welldone, Bangkok
  • Copywriter, JEH United, Bangkok

1. How did you end up being a creative?

I'm an orange that fell close to the tree. Both of my parents are working in the advertising industry. My mom used to be a creative director at Far East DDB, Bangkok. My dad used to in account servicing at Ogilvy, Bangkok. My dad once told me to be an AE because they can go home early. I’ve always believed in the power of creativity that transforms society to be better and I want to be a part of it.

2. What's your favourite piece of work in your portfolio?

If you ask me this question last year, my answer would be different. But if you ask me today, I've got several project that I think are great. One of them is work we did for Five Star Chicken, one of the biggest local chicken shops. In 37 years, they have one big problem, which is that can’t connect with the new generation. So they gave us a brief to create a film that connects every generation. Instead of coming up with hundreds of ideas, we chose to throw the brief to the consumer and let them create a story. Introducing ‘The Movies That Made (From) Us’, a user-generated film that wins the heart of every generation.

3. What's your favourite piece of work created by someone else?

I would like to highlight work from Thailand that I really like. Netflix’s ‘The Eyeballs Heist’ for the launch of Money Heist Korean. When I saw this work, my mind was blown. The concept was to heist your eyeballs, so they literally heisted billboards all around Bangkok. The best part of this idea is that they heist the billboard that already has existing brands. People discussed whether this campaign was a heist or a collaboration. Netflix won in every way.

4. What/who are your key creative influences?

All the great campaigns from everywhere around the world.

5. What kind of student were you?

A student who sits behind the classroom.

6. What's the craziest thing you've ever done?

Whatever happens in Cannes stays in Cannes.

7. What career did you think you'd have when you were a kid?

To be a film director.

8. Do you work best under pressure, or when things are calm?

Under pressure but not underpaid.

9. How would your co-workers describe you?

Crazy Pete.

10. Tell us about an artist (any medium) that we've never probably heard of.

Puma Blue. Check him out.

11. Do you have a nickname? How did you get it?

Pete. From my saint ‘Peter’.

Source:
Campaign Asia

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