Ad Nut
Mar 12, 2019

Ikea introduces itself to Penang, in Hokkien

BBH Singapore makes Hokkien-Swedish rhymes to ingratiate the brand in advance of a new store opening.

Ad Nut feels fairly confident that the people of Penang actually know what Ikea is. But wordplay is always welcome in Ad Nut's book, and cross-language wordplay meant to endear a brand to a new community even more so. So Ad Nut approves of this campaign by BBH Singapore for the Swedish furniture giant's opening in Penang on 14 March.

The campaign includes OOH, digital, print and social. A second phase will focus on product-centred stories, supported by "rich, immersive spots" that will run on digital platforms, Ad Nut has been informed.

CREDITS

Chief Creative Officer: Joakim Borgstrom
Creative Directors: Gaston Soto, Mara Vidal
Writers: Luke Somasundram
Art Directors: Grace Wong
Planning Director: Lizzie Nolan
Account Director: Alicia Tiong
Account Manager: Nafisah Nordin
Producer: Wendi Chong 

Ad Nut is a surprisingly literate woodland creature that for unknown reasons has an unhealthy obsession with advertising. Ad Nut gathers ads from all over Asia and the world for your viewing pleasure, because Ad Nut loves you. You can also check out Ad Nut's Advertising Hall of Fame, or read about Ad Nut's strange obsession with 'murderous beasts'.

 

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