Matthew Miller
Apr 4, 2014

Pepsi pits folklore underdogs against big red rival in Japan

JAPAN - Revelling in its challenger status, Pepsi has launched a series of TVCs in Japan that will see a folklore hero called Momotaro ('Peach boy') and his band of underdog heroes (one of whom is actually called 'Dog') doing battle against giant red ogres.

wide player in 16:9 format. Used on article page for Campaign.

The first instalment in the series, by creative agency Tugboat, appears above. The series will continue throughout the year, with the next episode slated for May.

Momotaro symbolizes “challenge”, according to the agency, which helpfully points out (in case the symbolism is not blindingly obvious) that the big bad red demons represent "the rival Pepsi has always been battling with".  

The campaign, for Pepsi's Nex Zero variant, also includes print, OOH and a website.

CREDITS

Client: Suntory Holdings Limited
Product: Pepsi Zero
Title: “The peach boy” Episode Zero
Duration: 90 sec 
Creative Agency: Tugboat

Creative Director: Yasumichi Oka, Shin Takaue
Copy writer/Creative Director: Taku Tada
Art Director: Seijo Kawaguchi
Director: Koichi Iguchi
DOP: Darren Lew
Producer: Masakatsu Kasai, Sunao Nonaka
Production company: Tohokushinsha Film Corporation
Other agency(s): Yomiko Advertising

 

Related Articles

Just Published

1 hour ago

S Subramanyeswar takes over as CEO at MullenLowe ...

Jaleel was chairman and group CCO while Tandon was group CEO

1 hour ago

As crypto crashes, what’s the next big Super Bowl ...

After FTX filed for bankruptcy this month, agencies are watching for emerging categories at this year’s marketing extravaganza — but they haven’t counted crypto out just yet.

1 hour ago

Twitter advertisers exit as brand safety concerns ...

Agency leaders warn that cutting resources into moderation and Musk’s own behaviour on Twitter is turning advertisers away from the platform.

1 hour ago

What we can learn from the media landscape in Japan

Steve Taylor ruminates on the built-in playfulness that Japan lends to its ad landscape