Matthew Miller
Oct 29, 2013

Campaign encourages connection with Australia's 'First peoples'

AUSTRALIA - The faces and words of four Victorian aboriginal people invite Australians to visit a new permanent exhibit titled 'First Peoples' at the Melbourne Museum.

wide player in 16:9 format. Used on article page for Campaign.

The campaign by design and strategy agency Clear is rolling out across TV, print, online, outdoor, social media and cinema and will run for three months.

The executions, including a TVC (above) by C-Kol, all focus on the indigenous word "Wominjeka", which means "welcome".

The brief from the museum was to "harness the spirit, joy, cultural knowledge and stories of the Yulendj Group of Elders—who contributed to the exhibition—and bring local indigenous language to the attention of a broader audience," according to Clear.

First Peoples is now open at Bunjilaka Aboriginal Cultural Centre at Melbourne Museum. 

CREDITS

Design / Art Direction
Megan Wardle – Designer (Clear)
Matthew McCarthy – Art Director (Clear)

Film
Directors – Jessie Oldfield and Adam Murfet (C-Kol)

Copywriting
Rob Sweetten (Writer Guy)

Additional photography
Scottie Cameron (Scottie Cameron Photography)

Typography
Dennis Payongayog (Friends of Type)

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