Chris Reed
Nov 6, 2012

Visiting China Mr Bond? Very wise.

It’s ironic that Visit Britain, the UK’s tourism marketing agency, have used the new James Bond film, Skyfall, and the brand of James Bond as the centrepieces for their latest marketing campaign.Ir...

Visiting China Mr Bond? Very wise.

It’s ironic that Visit Britain, the UK’s tourism marketing agency, have used the new James Bond film, Skyfall, and the brand of James Bond as the centrepieces for their latest marketing campaign.

Ironic because if you watch the film, especially from somewhere like Singapore as I did, then all you can see are reasons to leave Britain, not visit it! Instead the film promotes the delights of the Far East and especially China.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5QGLzN3ZsiU

I went to see the film with some Chinese and European friends and we all came out saying  “well that was all about the new modern world of Asia trumping the old crumbling world of the UK and Europe”.

The film’s shots of Shanghai at night were more dramatic and enticing than any of the oldie world shots of crumbling monuments and grey, rain filled skies of London. Even Macau looked more exotic and romantic.

Skyfall really didn’t present Britain and London in a great light. Even the shots of cold, foggy, wet Scotland summed up why anyone who hadn’t visited would give that a miss too….

From the London Underground scenes to the London skyline shots, from the street scenes to old fashioned buildings, to the poetry that M read out at her hearing. The overall feel of the film is that Bond/M and by association Britain were too old for the job now and that the world had moved on and passed them all by. Inescapably eclipsed by Asia.

The scene with the classic Aston Martin being rescued from the garage with the old GB car sticker on summed up the film. It was a great scene but its ultimate destruction felt like the end of an era. Old Britain had given way to a brand new world which it felt lost in and left behind.

Skyfall is as much a film about why you should visit contemporary, sophisticated China as it is about visiting historic, quaint Britain.

Sub-consciously the film had set out to present a positive light on the UK and ended up presenting reasons to visit China instead. New v’s old.

Visit Britain are doing Visit China a favour by promoting the film. Shanghai never looked better by comparison.

Tags

Related Articles

Just Published

1 day ago

Uproar: Are animal portrayals in ads a new brand risk?

Advertisers and agencies love animals, because animals sell. But a Year of the Tiger Gucci campaign that made activists growl shows that the definition of what’s appropriate may be evolving when it comes to using the world's fauna.

1 day ago

Mark Heap on ‘moving across the aisles’ to ...

Media agencies offer broadly the same services as one another, and use propositions like ‘good growth’ and ‘people first’ to establish an identity. But what do these mean, in practical terms, and how do they influence leadership strategies? Mark Heap takes us inside the industry.

1 day ago

The ride of the tiger: Feast your eyes on BMW's ...

While other brands make long, dramatic Chinese New Year films, the carmaker and TBWA's Bolt have programmed in a very different route: 90 seconds that's 'nothing but sheer joy'.

1 day ago

The Beijing Olympics: A non-starter for global sponsors

SHANGHAI ZHAN PODCAST: Beijing-based sports-marketing expert Mark Dreyer says the games will see largely Chinese brands targeting the China market, with many employing Chinese-American skier/model Eileen Gu.