Jenny Chan 陳詠欣
Feb 9, 2015

Danny Mok replaces Donald Chan as CEO of Leo Burnett China

SHANGHAI - Danny Mok (莫熙慈) is officially the new CEO of Leo Burnett's China operations as of tomorrow, after predecessor Donald Chan's (陈念端) departure.

L-R: Ziebinski and Mok
L-R: Ziebinski and Mok

Mok will report directly to Jarek Ziebinski (叶瑞克), chairman and CEO of Leo Burnett Asia Pacific, and will be responsible for the agency's offices in Shanghai, Beijing and Guangzhou.

Last year, Leo Burnett lost two long-time clients, BMW China and Coca-Cola, under Chan's watch. Leo Burnett did not provide a reason for Chan's departure, and he could not be reached for comment. In September last year Leo Burnett consolidated its APAC and Greater China reporting lines under Ziebinski.

Mok has experience in senior roles on the agency and client sides over two decades in Shanghai and Hong Kong. He was most recently chief marketing officer for Hong Kong’s mobile communications operator, CSL Limited, managing the CSL corporate brand as well as 1010, One2Free and New World Mobility until November 2014. Before that he was CEO for Hong Kong and Shanghai at Grey, where he spent eight years. That followed a seven-year stint at BBDO in Hong Kong. He started his career at DMB&B 20 years ago. 

 

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